Collected Evidence: Collected Evidence: Bury pipelines instead of surface laying and rock dumping We found no studies that evaluated the effects of burying pipelines instead of surface laying and rock dumping on subtidal benthic invertebrate populations.   ‘We found no studies’ means that we have not yet found any studies that have directly evaluated this intervention during our systematic journal and report searches. Therefore, we have no evidence to indicate whether or not the intervention has any desirable or harmful effects.Collected Evidencehttps%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F2056https%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F2056Mon, 21 Oct 2019 13:33:30 +0100Collected Evidence: Collected Evidence: Cease or prohibit oil and gas drilling We found no studies that evaluated the effects of ceasing or prohibiting oil and gas drilling on subtidal benthic invertebrate populations.   ‘We found no studies’ means that we have not yet found any studies that have directly evaluated this intervention during our systematic journal and report searches. Therefore, we have no evidence to indicate whether or not the intervention has any desirable or harmful effects.Collected Evidencehttps%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F2061https%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F2061Mon, 21 Oct 2019 13:43:42 +0100Collected Evidence: Collected Evidence: Cease or prohibit the deposit of drill cuttings on the seabed We found no studies that evaluated the effects of ceasing or prohibiting the deposit of drill cuttings on the seabed on subtidal benthic invertebrate populations.   ‘We found no studies’ means that we have not yet found any studies that have directly evaluated this intervention during our systematic journal and report searches. Therefore, we have no evidence to indicate whether or not the intervention has any desirable or harmful effects.Collected Evidencehttps%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F2062https%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F2062Mon, 21 Oct 2019 13:45:24 +0100Collected Evidence: Collected Evidence: Bury drill cuttings in the seabed rather than leaving them on the seabed surface  We found no studies that evaluated the effects of burying drill cuttings in the seabed rather than leaving them on the seabed surface on subtidal benthic invertebrate populations.   ‘We found no studies’ means that we have not yet found any studies that have directly evaluated this intervention during our systematic journal and report searches. Therefore, we have no evidence to indicate whether or not the intervention has any desirable or harmful effects.Collected Evidencehttps%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F2066https%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F2066Mon, 21 Oct 2019 13:49:32 +0100Collected Evidence: Collected Evidence: Cease or prohibit aggregate extraction Seven studies examined the effects of ceasing or prohibiting aggregate extraction on subtidal benthic invertebrate populations. One study was in the English Channel (France), one in the Mediterranean Sea (Italy), one a global study, and four in the North Sea (UK, Belgium).   COMMUNITY RESPONSE (6 STUDIES) Overall community composition (4 studies): One global systematic review found that it took nine months to several decades for overall invertebrate community composition to recover after ceasing aggregate extraction. One before-and-after, site comparison study in the Mediterranean Sea and one of two site comparison studies in the North Sea found that after ceasing aggregate extraction overall invertebrate community composition became more similar to pre-extraction and/or natural site communities. Overall richness/diversity (5 studies): Two before-and-after, site comparison studies in the English Channel and the Mediterranean Sea and one of two site comparison studies in the North Sea found that after ceasing aggregate extraction, overall invertebrate species richness and/or diversity became more similar to that of pre-extraction and/or natural sites. The other site comparison found that species richness did not change over time and remained different to that of natural sites. One replicated, site comparison study in the North Sea found that 21 months after ceasing aggregate extractiom, invertebrate species richness was similar to that of natural sites. Worm community composition (1 study): One before-and-after study in the North Sea found that after ceasing aggregate extraction, nematode worm community composition remained different to the pre-extraction community. Worm richness/diversity (1 study): One before-and-after study in the North Sea found that after ceasing aggregate extraction, nematode worm species richness remained different to pre-extraction richness. POPULATION RESPONSE (6 STUDIES) Overall abundance (5 studies): Two before-and-after, site comparison studies in the English Channel and the Mediterranean Sea and one of two site comparison studies in the North Sea found that after ceasing aggregate extraction overall invertebrate abundance and/or biomass became more similar to that of pre-extraction and/or natural sites. The other site comparison found that abundance and biomass did not change over time and remained different to that of natural sites. One replicated, site comparison study in the North Sea found that 21 months after ceasing aggregate extraction, invertebrate abundance was similar to that of natural sites. Worm abundance (1 study): One before-and-after study in the North Sea found that after ceasing aggregate extraction, nematode worm abundance remained different to pre-extraction abundance. Collected Evidencehttps%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F2070https%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F2070Mon, 21 Oct 2019 14:07:13 +0100Collected Evidence: Collected Evidence: Cease or prohibit marine mining One study examined the effects of ceasing or prohibiting mining on subtidal benthic invertebrate populations. The study was in the Bering Sea (USA).   COMMUNITY RESPONSE (1 STUDY) Overall community composition (1 study): One site comparison study in the Bering Sea found that following cessation of gold mining, overall invertebrate community composition became similar to that of an unmined site. Overall richness/diversity (1 study): One site comparison study in the Bering Sea found that following cessation of gold mining, overall invertebrate richness and diversity became similar to that of an unmined site. POPULATION RESPONSE (1 STUDY) Overall abundance (1 study): One site comparison study in the Bering Sea found that following cessation of gold mining, overall invertebrate abundance and biomass became similar to that of an unmined site. Collected Evidencehttps%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F2075https%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F2075Mon, 21 Oct 2019 14:43:03 +0100Collected Evidence: Collected Evidence: Cease or prohibit mining waste (tailings) disposal at sea We found no studies that evaluated the effects of ceasing or prohibiting mining waste (tailings) disposal at sea on subtidal benthic invertebrate populations.   ‘We found no studies’ means that we have not yet found any studies that have directly evaluated this intervention during our systematic journal and report searches. Therefore, we have no evidence to indicate whether or not the intervention has any desirable or harmful effects.Collected Evidencehttps%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F2076https%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F2076Mon, 21 Oct 2019 14:43:47 +0100Collected Evidence: Collected Evidence: Co-locate aquaculture systems with other activities and other infrastructures (such as wind farms) to maximise use of marine space We found no studies that evaluated the effects of limiting the number and/or extent of, or prohibit additional, renewable energy installations in an area on subtidal benthic invertebrate populations.   ‘We found no studies’ means that we have not yet found any studies that have directly evaluated this intervention during our systematic journal and report searches. Therefore, we have no evidence to indicate whether or not the intervention has any desirable or harmful effects.Collected Evidencehttps%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F2079https%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F2079Mon, 21 Oct 2019 14:46:54 +0100Collected Evidence: Collected Evidence: Bury cables and pipelines in the seabed rather than laying them on the seabed We found no studies that evaluated the effects of burying cables and pipelines in the seabed rather than laying them on the seabed on subtidal benthic invertebrate populations.   ‘We found no studies’ means that we have not yet found any studies that have directly evaluated this intervention during our systematic journal and report searches. Therefore, we have no evidence to indicate whether or not the intervention has any desirable or harmful effects.Collected Evidencehttps%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F2082https%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F2082Mon, 21 Oct 2019 14:48:59 +0100Collected Evidence: Collected Evidence: Cease or prohibit shipping  Three studies examined the effects of ceasing or prohibiting shipping on subtidal benthic invertebrate populations. All studies were in the North Sea (Belgium, Germany, Netherlands).   COMMUNITY RESPONSE (2 STUDIES) Overall community composition (1 study): One site comparison study in the North Sea found that areas closed to shipping developed different overall invertebrate community compositions compared to areas where shipping occurred. Overall species richness/diversity (1 study): One site comparison study in the North Sea found that areas closed to shipping did not develop different overall invertebrate species richness and diversity compared to areas where shipping occurred. POPULATION RESPONSE (2 STUDIES) Overall abundance (2 studies): Two site comparison studies (one before-and-after) in the North Sea found that areas closed to shipping had similar overall invertebrate abundance and biomass compared to areas where shipping occurred. Overall abundance (2 studies): Two site comparison studies (one before-and-after) in the North Sea found that areas closed to shipping had similar overall invertebrate abundance and biomass compared to areas where shipping occurred. OTHER (2 STUDIES) Overall community energy flow (1 study): One before-after, site comparison study in the North Sea found that after closing an area to shipping, invertebrate community energy flow did not change, but it increased in nearby areas where shipping occurred. Species energy flow (1 study): One before-and-after, site comparison study in the North Sea found that closing an area to shipping had mixed effects on species-level energy flow.  Collected Evidencehttps%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F2086https%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F2086Mon, 21 Oct 2019 14:54:50 +0100Collected Evidence: Collected Evidence: Cease or prohibit all types of fishing Five studies examined the effects of ceasing or prohibiting all types of fishing on subtidal benthic invertebrate populations. All studies were in the North Sea (Belgium, Germany, Netherlands, UK).   COMMUNITY RESPONSE (2 STUDIES) Overall community composition (2 studies): Two site comparison studies (one before-and-after) in the North Sea found that areas closed to all fishing developed different overall invertebrate community compositions compared to fished areas. Overall species richness/diversity (2 studies): One of two site comparison studies (one before-and-after) in the North Sea found that areas closed to all fishing did not develop different overall invertebrate species richness and diversity compared to fished areas after three years, but the other found higher species richness in the closed areas after 20 years. POPULATION RESPONSE (3 STUDIES) Overall abundance (2 studies): Two site comparison studies (one before-and-after) in the North Sea found that areas closed to all fishing had similar overall invertebrate abundance and biomass compared to fished areas after three and five years. Crustacean abundance (1 study): One before-and-after, site comparison study in the North Sea found that closing a site to all fishing led to similar numbers of lobster compared to a fished site after 20 months. Crustacean condition (1 study): One before-and-after, site comparison study in the North Sea found that closing a site to all fishing led to larger sizes of lobster compared to a fished site after 20 months. OTHER (1 STUDY) Overall community energy flow (1 study): One before-after, site comparison study in the North Sea found that, during the 12–14 months after closing an area to all fishing, the invertebrate community structure (measured as energy flow) at sites within the closed area did not change, but that it increased in nearby fished sites. Species energy flow (1 study): One before-and-after, site comparison study in the North Sea found that closing an area to all fishing for 12–14 months had mixed effects on species-level energy flow. Collected Evidencehttps%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F2096https%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F2096Mon, 21 Oct 2019 15:32:10 +0100Collected Evidence: Collected Evidence: Cease or prohibit commercial fishing Three studies examined the effects of ceasing or prohibiting commercial fishing on subtidal benthic invertebrate populations. Two studies were in the Tasman Sea (New Zealand), the third on Gorges Bank in the North Atlantic Ocean (USA).   COMMUNITY RESPONSE (2 STUDIES) Overall community composition (1 study): One site comparison study in the Tasman Sea  found that an area closed to commercial trawling and dredging for 28 years had different overall invertebrate communities than an area subject to commercial fishing. Overall species richness/diversity (1 study): One site comparison study on Georges Bank found no difference in invertebrate species richness between an area closed to commercial fishing for 10 to 14 years and a fished area. POPULATION RESPONSE (3 STUDIES) Overall abundance (2 studies): Two site comparison studies in the Tasman Sea  and on Georges Bank found that areas prohibiting commercial fishing for 10 to 14 years and 28 years had greater overall invertebrate abundance compared to areas where commercial fishing occurred. One of the studies  also found higher biomass, while the other found similar biomass in closed and fished areas. Crustacean abundance (1 study): One replicated, site comparison study in the Tasman Sea found that in commercial fishing exclusion zones lobster abundance was not different to adjacent fished areas after up to two years. OTHER (1 STUDY) Overall community biological production (1 study): One site comparison study in the Tasman Sea  found that an area closed to commercial trawling and dredging for 28 years had greater biological production from invertebrates than an area where commercial fishing occurred. Collected Evidencehttps%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F2097https%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F2097Mon, 21 Oct 2019 15:41:48 +0100Collected Evidence: Collected Evidence: Cease or prohibit bottom trawling Four studies examined the effects of ceasing or prohibiting bottom trawling on subtidal benthic invertebrate populations. Two studies were in the Bering Sea (USA), one in the North Sea, and one in the Mediterranean Sea (Italy).   COMMUNITY RESPONSE (3 STUDIES) Overall community composition (2 studies): Two site comparison studies (one before-and-after, one replicated) in the North Sea and the Mediterranean Sea found that in areas prohibiting trawling for either 15 or 20 years, overall invertebrate community composition was different to that of trawled areas. Overall species richness/diversity (3 studies): Two of three site comparison studies (one paired, one before-and-after, one replicated) in the Bering Sea, the North Sea, and the Mediterranean Sea found that invertebrate diversity was higher in sites closed to trawling compared to trawled sites after either 37 or 15 years, but the other found no differences after 20 years. POPULATION RESPONSE (3 STUDIES) Overall abundance (2 studies): One of two site comparison studies (one paired, one replicated) in the Bering Sea and the Mediterranean Sea found that total invertebrate abundance was higher in sites closed to trawling compared to trawled sites after 37 years, but the other found no differences after 20 years. Both found no differences in total invertebrate biomass. Unwanted catch overall abundance (1 study): One replicated, before-and-after, site comparison study in the Bering Sea found that during the three years after closing areas to all bottom trawling, unwanted catch of crabs appeared to have decreased, while no changes appeared to have occurred in nearby trawled areas. Collected Evidencehttps%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F2099https%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F2099Tue, 22 Oct 2019 08:41:27 +0100Collected Evidence: Collected Evidence: Cease or prohibit midwater/semi-pelagic trawling We found no studies that evaluated the effects of ceasing or prohibiting midwater/semi-pelagic trawling on subtidal benthic invertebrate populations.   ‘We found no studies’ means that we have not yet found any studies that have directly evaluated this intervention during our systematic journal and report searches. Therefore, we have no evidence to indicate whether or not the intervention has any desirable or harmful effects.Collected Evidencehttps%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F2100https%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F2100Tue, 22 Oct 2019 08:44:14 +0100Collected Evidence: Collected Evidence: Cease or prohibit dredging Four studies examined the effects of ceasing or prohibiting dredging on subtidal benthic invertebrate populations. One study was in the North Atlantic Ocean (Portugal), one in the South Atlantic Ocean (Argentina), one in the English Channel and one in the Irish Sea (UK).   COMMUNITY RESPONSE (3 STUDIES) Overall community composition (3 studies): One of three site comparison studies (one replicated, one before-and-after) in Atlantic Ocean and the Irish Sea found that after ceasing dredging, overall invertebrate community composition was different to that in dredged areas. The other two found that communities remained similar in dredged and non-dredged areas. Overall richness/diversity (3 studies): One of three site comparison studies (one replicated, one before-and-after) in Atlantic Ocean and the Irish Sea found that after ceasing dredging, large (macro-) invertebrate diversity was higher but small (meio-) invertebrate diversity was lower compared to dredged areas. The other two found that overall diversity remained similar in dredged and non-dredged areas. POPULATION RESPONSE (3 STUDIES) Overall abundance (3 studies): One of three site comparison studies (one replicated, one before-and-after) in Atlantic Ocean and the Irish Sea found that four years after ceasing dredging, large (macro-) and small (meio-) invertebrate abundance and/or biomass appeared higher to that in dredged areas. The other two found that abundance and/or biomass remained similar in dredged and non-dredged areas after either two or six years. Tunicate abundance (1 study): One replicated, site comparison study in the English Channel found that a year after ceasing dredging in three areas, abundance of ascidians/sea squirts (tunicates) was similar to that in dredged areas. Bryozoan abundance (1 study): One replicated, site comparison study in the English Channel found that a year after ceasing dredging in three areas, abundance of bryozoan was higher than in dredged areas. Crustacean abundance (1 study): One replicated, site comparison study in the English Channel found that a year after ceasing dredging in three areas, abundance of spider crabs was higher than in dredged areas, but abundance of edible crab was similar. Cnidarian abundance (1 study): One replicated, site comparison study in the English Channel found that a year after ceasing dredging in three areas, abundance of sea fans was higher than in dredged areas. Sponge abundance (1 study): One replicated, site comparison study in the English Channel found that a year after ceasing dredging in three areas, abundance of sponges was higher than in dredged areas. Collected Evidencehttps%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F2101https%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F2101Tue, 22 Oct 2019 08:53:41 +0100Collected Evidence: Collected Evidence: Cease or prohibit all towed (mobile) fishing gear Eight studies examined the effects of ceasing or prohibiting all towed fishing gear on subtidal benthic invertebrate populations. One study was in the Limfjord (Denmark), two in the English Channel (UK), three in Georges Bank in the North Atlantic Ocean (USA and Canada), one in the Ria Formosa lagoon (Portugal), and one in the Irish Sea (Isle of Man).   COMMUNITY RESPONSE (4 STUDIES) Overall community composition (3 studies): Two of three replicated, site comparison studies in the Limfjord and the English Channel, found that areas excluding towed fishing gear for either an unspecified amount of time or two to 23 years had different overall invertebrate community composition compared to areas where towed-fishing occurred and one found that ceasing towed-gear fishing for nine years had mixed effects. Overall species richness/diversity (3 studies): Two replicated, site comparison studies in the English Channel reported that areas excluding towed fishing gear for either an unspecified amount of time or two to 23 years had different or greater invertebrate species richness and diversity to areas where towed-fishing occurred. One site comparison study in Georges Bank found no difference in invertebrate species richness between an area closed to mobile fishing gear for 10 to 14 years and a fished area. POPULATION RESPONSE (3 STUDIES) Overall abundance (3 studies): Two site comparison studies (one replicated) in the English Channel and Georges Bank found that sites excluding towed gear for either two to 23 years or 10 to 14 years had greater overall invertebrate biomass compared to sites where towed-gear fishing occurred, but one also found that abundance was similar in both areas. One replicated, controlled, before-and-after study in the Ria Formosa lagoon found that ceasing towed gear for 10 months led to increases in the cover of mobile but not sessile Mollusc abundance (2 studies): Two site comparison studies (one replicated) in the Irish Sea and the English Channel found that areas closed to towed fishing gear for either two to 23 years or 14 years had more scallops compared to adjacent fished areas. Mollusc condition (1 study): One site comparison study the Irish Sea found that an area closed to towed fishing gear for 14 years had higher proportions of older and larger scallops compared to an adjacent fished area. Starfish abundance (1 study): One replicated, site comparison study in Georges Bank found more starfish in areas closed to towed fishing gear for five to nine years compared to adjacent fished areas. Starfish condition (1 study): One replicated, site comparison study in Georges Bank found that starfish arm length was similar in areas closed to towed fishing gear for five to nine years and adjacent fished areas. OTHER (1 STUDY) Overall community biological production (1 study): One before-and-after, site comparison study in Georges Bank found an increase in the biological production from invertebrate in sites closed to towed fishing gear for approximately five years compared to adjacent fished sites. Collected Evidencehttps%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F2102https%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F2102Tue, 22 Oct 2019 08:58:29 +0100Collected Evidence: Collected Evidence: Cease or prohibit static fishing gear We found no studies that evaluated the effects of ceasing or prohibiting static fishing gear on subtidal benthic invertebrate populations.   ‘We found no studies’ means that we have not yet found any studies that have directly evaluated this intervention during our systematic journal and report searches. Therefore, we have no evidence to indicate whether or not the intervention has any desirable or harmful effects.Collected Evidencehttps%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F2103https%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F2103Tue, 22 Oct 2019 09:29:55 +0100Collected Evidence: Collected Evidence: Clean the hull, anchor and chain of commercial and recreational vessels We found no studies that evaluated the effects of cleaning the hull, anchor and chain of commercial and recreational vessels on subtidal benthic invertebrate populations.   ‘We found no studies’ means that we have not yet found any studies that have directly evaluated this intervention during our systematic journal and report searches. Therefore, we have no evidence to indicate whether or not the intervention has any desirable or harmful effects.Collected Evidencehttps%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F2166https%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F2166Tue, 22 Oct 2019 12:16:33 +0100Collected Evidence: Collected Evidence: Clean anthropogenic platforms, structures or equipment We found no studies that evaluated the effects of cleaning anthropogenic platforms, structures or equipment on subtidal benthic invertebrate populations.   ‘We found no studies’ means that we have not yet found any studies that have directly evaluated this intervention during our systematic journal and report searches. Therefore, we have no evidence to indicate whether or not the intervention has any desirable or harmful effects.Collected Evidencehttps%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F2167https%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F2167Tue, 22 Oct 2019 12:17:14 +0100Collected Evidence: Collected Evidence: Add chemicals or minerals to sediments to remove or neutralise pollutants Two studies examined the effects of adding chemicals or minerals to sediments to remove or neutralise pollutants on subtidal benthic invertebrate populations. Both studies evaluated the use of coal ash in Hiroshima Bay (Japan).   COMMUNITY RESPONSE (1 STUDY) Overall richness/diversity (1 study): One controlled, before-and-after study in Hiroshima Bay found that adding coal ash increased invertebrate species richness in winter but not summer compared to untreated sites. POPULATION RESPONSE (2 STUDIES) Overall abundance (2 studies): One controlled, before-and-after study in Hiroshima Bay found that adding coal ash increased invertebrate abundance in winter but not summer compared to untreated sites. One controlled study in Hiroshima Bay found that one of two types of coal ash increased combined invertebrate and fish abundance, but not biomass. Collected Evidencehttps%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F2176https%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F2176Tue, 22 Oct 2019 12:27:40 +0100Collected Evidence: Collected Evidence: Cease or prohibit aquaculture activity Two studies examined the effects of ceasing or prohibiting aquaculture activity on subtidal benthic invertebrate populations. Both studies were in the Mediterranean Sea (Italy and Spain).   COMMUNITY RESPONSE (2 STUDIES) Overall community composition (1 study): One before-and-after, site comparison study in the Mediterranean Sea found that after ceasing aquaculture activity invertebrate community composition remained different to that of an unfarmed site. Worm community composition (1 study): One before-and-after, site comparison study in the Mediterranean Sea found that after ceasing aquaculture activity worm community composition community composition remained different to that of an unfarmed site. POPULATION RESPONSE (2 STUDIES) Overall abundance (1 study): One before-and-after, site comparison study in the Mediterranean Sea found that after ceasing aquaculture activity overall invertebrate abundance was similar to an unfarmed site. Worm abundance (1 study): One before-and-after, site comparison study in the Mediterranean Sea found that after ceasing aquaculture activity abundance of health-indicating worms increased, and abundance of pollution-indicating worms decreased. Collected Evidencehttps%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F2185https%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F2185Tue, 22 Oct 2019 12:46:43 +0100Collected Evidence: Collected Evidence: Bury electricity cables to reduce electromagnetic fields We found no studies that evaluated the effects of burying electricity cables to reduce electromagnetic fields on subtidal benthic invertebrate populations.   ‘We found no studies’ means that we have not yet found any studies that have directly evaluated this intervention during our systematic journal and report searches. Therefore, we have no evidence to indicate whether or not the intervention has any desirable or harmful effects.Collected Evidencehttps%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F2207https%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F2207Tue, 22 Oct 2019 13:19:14 +0100Collected Evidence: Collected Evidence: Cease or prohibit the harvesting of scallops Three studies examined the effects of ceasing or prohibiting the harvesting of scallops on their populations. One study was in the South Atlantic Ocean (Argentina), one in the English Channel (UK) and one in the Irish Sea (UK).   COMMUNITY RESPONSE (0 STUDIES) POPULATION RESPONSE (3 STUDIES) Scallop abundance (3 studies): Two of three site comparison studies (one replicated, one before-and-after) in the South Atlantic Ocean, the English Channel, and the Irish Sea found that in areas where scallop harvesting had stopped scallop abundance was similar, and one found that scallop biomass was higher, compared to harvested areas.  Collected Evidencehttps%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F2277https%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F2277Wed, 23 Oct 2019 12:53:07 +0100Collected Evidence: Collected Evidence: Cease or prohibit the harvest of conch We found no studies that evaluated the effects of ceasing or prohibiting the harvest of conch on their populations.   ‘We found no studies’ means that we have not yet found any studies that have directly evaluated this intervention during our systematic journal and report searches. Therefore, we have no evidence to indicate whether or not the intervention has any desirable or harmful effects.Collected Evidencehttps%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F2278https%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F2278Wed, 23 Oct 2019 13:35:19 +0100Collected Evidence: Collected Evidence: Cease or prohibit the harvest of sea urchins We found no studies that evaluated the effects ceasing or prohibiting the harvest of sea urchins on their populations.   ‘We found no studies’ means that we have not yet found any studies that have directly evaluated this intervention during our systematic journal and report searches. Therefore, we have no evidence to indicate whether or not the intervention has any desirable or harmful effects.Collected Evidencehttps%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F2279https%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F2279Wed, 23 Oct 2019 13:36:04 +0100
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What Works in Conservation

What Works in Conservation provides expert assessments of the effectiveness of actions, based on summarised evidence, in synopses. Subjects covered so far include amphibians, birds, mammals, forests, peatland and control of freshwater invasive species. More are in progress.

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The Conservation Evidence Journal

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