Providing evidence to improve practice
Collected Evidence: Individual Study: A botanical survey of conservation headlands in Breckland Environmentally Sensistive Area, UKIndividual Studyhttp%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Findividual-study%2F42http%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Findividual-study%2F42Thu, 21 Oct 2004 14:33:00 +0100Collected Evidence: Individual Study: A field experiment to recreate species rich hay meadows using regional seed mixturesIndividual Studyhttp%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Findividual-study%2F1087http%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Findividual-study%2F1087Tue, 28 Oct 2008 10:55:00 +0000Collected Evidence: Individual Study: A beetle fauna of oolitic limestone grassland, and the responses of species to conservation management by different cutting regimesIndividual Studyhttp%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Findividual-study%2F1559http%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Findividual-study%2F1559Wed, 25 Nov 2009 10:17:00 +0000Collected Evidence: Individual Study: A region-wide experiment with functional agrobiodiversity (FAB) in arable farming in the NetherlandsIndividual Studyhttp%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Findividual-study%2F2447http%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Findividual-study%2F2447Tue, 04 Oct 2011 14:14:56 +0100Collected Evidence: Individual Study: A study of grasshopper populations in Countryside Stewardship Scheme field margins in EssexIndividual Studyhttp%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Findividual-study%2F2680http%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Findividual-study%2F2680Tue, 04 Oct 2011 14:14:59 +0100Collected Evidence: Individual Study: 'Beetle banks' as refuges for beneficial arthropods in farmland: long-term changes in predator communities and habitatIndividual Studyhttp%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Findividual-study%2F2835http%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Findividual-study%2F2835Tue, 04 Oct 2011 14:15:01 +0100Collected Evidence: Individual Study: A simultaneous assessment of farmland habitat use by breeding skylarks and yellowhammersIndividual Studyhttp%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Findividual-study%2F2876http%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Findividual-study%2F2876Tue, 04 Oct 2011 14:15:02 +0100Collected Evidence: Collected Evidence: Apply 'cross compliance' environmental standards linked to all subsidy payments We have captured no evidence for the effects of applying 'cross compliance' environmental standards for all subsidy payments on farmland wildlife. 'No evidence' for an action means we have not yet found any studies that directly and quantitatively tested this action during our systematic journal and report searches. Therefore we have been unable to assess whether or not the action is effective or has any harmful impacts. Please get in touch if you know of such a study for this action.  Collected Evidencehttp%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F70http%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F70Mon, 24 Oct 2011 20:59:15 +0100Collected Evidence: Collected Evidence: Buffer in-field ponds We have captured no evidence for the effects of buffering in-field ponds on farmland wildlife. 'No evidence' for an action means we have not yet found any studies that directly and quantitatively tested this action during our systematic journal and report searches. Therefore we have been unable to assess whether or not the action is effective or has any harmful impacts. Please get in touch if you know of such a study for this action.  Collected Evidencehttp%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F97http%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F97Mon, 24 Oct 2011 21:48:25 +0100Collected Evidence: Collected Evidence: Avoid use of lead shot We have captured no evidence for the effects of avoiding the use of lead shot on farmland wildlife. 'No evidence' for an action means we have not yet found any studies that directly and quantitatively tested this action during our systematic journal and report searches. Therefore we have been unable to assess whether or not the action is effective or has any harmful impacts. Please get in touch if you know of such a study for this action.  Collected Evidencehttp%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F100http%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F100Mon, 24 Oct 2011 21:52:38 +0100Collected Evidence: Collected Evidence: Control invasive non-native plants on farmland (such as Himalayan Balsam, Japanese knotweed) Two randomized, replicated, controlled trials in the Czech Republic found that removing all flower heads of giant hogweed plants at peak flowering time dramatically reduced seed production in giant hogweed.  Collected Evidencehttp%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F104http%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F104Mon, 24 Oct 2011 21:59:27 +0100Collected Evidence: Collected Evidence: Control bracken One systematic review found that the herbicide asulam reduced bracken abundance if applied repeatedly, but cutting may be equally effective. A replicated laboratory trial in the UK found that the herbicide asulam inhibited the growth of three common moss species that commonly grow in association with bracken, when exposed over three weeks, but not if only exposed for 24 hours.  Collected Evidencehttp%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F105http%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F105Mon, 24 Oct 2011 22:00:36 +0100Collected Evidence: Collected Evidence: Control grey squirrels We have captured no evidence for the effects of controlling grey squirrels on farmland wildlife. 'No evidence' for an action means we have not yet found any studies that directly and quantitatively tested this action during our systematic journal and report searches. Therefore we have been unable to assess whether or not the action is effective or has any harmful impacts. Please get in touch if you know of such a study for this action.  Collected Evidencehttp%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F106http%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F106Mon, 24 Oct 2011 22:01:22 +0100Collected Evidence: Collected Evidence: Control mink A systematic review found seven studies demonstrating that trapping appears to be an effective method of reducing American mink populations, but firm conclusions could not be made due to limitations in experimental design. A large-scale trapping programme in the UK demonstrated that American mink have been successfully eradicated over a large area and this may have been associated with some localized water vole expansions. Collected Evidencehttp%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F107http%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F107Mon, 24 Oct 2011 22:02:53 +0100Collected Evidence: Individual Study: A review of the success of commonly used wet meadow restoration methods (rewetting, topsoil removal, and diaspore addition) in Western EuropeIndividual Studyhttp%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Findividual-study%2F3485http%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Findividual-study%2F3485Sun, 13 Nov 2011 20:07:03 +0000Collected Evidence: Collected Evidence: Add yellow rattle seed Rhinanthus minor to hay meadows A review of studies from the UK found that adding hay rattle seed helped other sown target meadow species to colonize and that more plant species were found when yellow rattle was present. A randomized, replicated controlled trial in the UK found that yellow rattle could be established on a pasture field by ‘slot seeding’.  Collected Evidencehttp%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F129http%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F129Mon, 14 Nov 2011 21:56:48 +0000Collected Evidence: Individual Study: A future for rare arable plantsIndividual Studyhttp%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Findividual-study%2F3511http%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Findividual-study%2F3511Tue, 22 Nov 2011 21:16:09 +0000Collected Evidence: Individual Study: A farm-scale evaluation of the influence of hedgerow cutting frequency on hawthorn (Crataegus monogyna) berry yieldsIndividual Studyhttp%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Findividual-study%2F3516http%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Findividual-study%2F3516Fri, 02 Dec 2011 15:34:09 +0000Collected Evidence: Collected Evidence: Connect areas of natural or semi-natural habitat All four studies (including one site comparison and two replicated trials) from the Czech Republic, Germany and the Netherlands investigating the effects of habitat corridors or restoring areas of natural or semi-natural habitat between existing patches found some degree of colonization of these areas by invertebrates or mammals. However for invertebrates one unreplicated site comparison reported that the colonization process was slow (Gruttke 1994), and three studies found that the extent of colonization varied between invertebrate taxa. One small, replicated study from the Czech Republic investigated colonization of two bio-corridors by small mammal species. It found more small mammal species in the bio-corridors than in an adjacent forest or arable fields. All three studies from Germany and the Netherlands looking at the effects on invertebrates found mixed results. One replicated study found more species of some wasps (cavity-nesting wasps and caterpillar-hunting wasps) in grass strips connected to forest edges than in isolated strips. An unreplicated study found that the abundance of three ground beetle species substantially increased in an arable field undergoing restoration to heathland but that typical heathland species failed to colonize over the 12 year period. One study found that two out of 85 ground beetle species used a meadow and hedge-island strip extending from semi-natural habitats into arable farmland. In the same study the habitat strip did not function well for ground beetles and harvestmen but was colonized by snails and spiders. Collected Evidencehttp%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F579http%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F579Thu, 04 Oct 2012 11:08:34 +0100Collected Evidence: Collected Evidence: Control predatory mammals and birds (foxes, crows, stoats and weasels) A total of nine individual studies from France and the UK (including five replicated controlled studies and a systematic review) looked at the effects of removing predators on birds. Three studies found controlling predatory mammals or birds (sometimes alongside other interventions) increased the abundance or population size of some birds. One of these studies from the UK found numbers of nationally declining songbirds increased on a site where predators were controlled, but there was no overall difference in bird abundance, species richness or diversity between predator control and no-control sites. Five studies (two replicated and controlled, two before-and-after trials) from the UK found some evidence for increased productivity, nest or reproductive success or survival of birds following bird or mammal predator control (sometimes alongside other interventions). A randomized, replicated, controlled study found hen harrier breeding success was no different between areas with and without hooded crow removal. A global systematic review including evidence from European farmland found that reproductive success of birds increased with predator removal.  Collected Evidencehttp%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F699http%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F699Thu, 20 Dec 2012 13:08:22 +0000