Providing evidence to improve practice
Collected Evidence: Individual Study: A botanical survey of conservation headlands in Breckland Environmentally Sensistive Area, UKIndividual Studyhttp%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Findividual-study%2F42http%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Findividual-study%2F42Thu, 21 Oct 2004 14:33:00 +0100Collected Evidence: Individual Study: A beetle fauna of oolitic limestone grassland, and the responses of species to conservation management by different cutting regimesIndividual Studyhttp%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Findividual-study%2F1559http%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Findividual-study%2F1559Wed, 25 Nov 2009 10:17:00 +0000Collected Evidence: Individual Study: A candidate legume pollinator, Osmia sanrafaelae Parker (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae)Individual Studyhttp%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Findividual-study%2F1733http%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Findividual-study%2F1733Wed, 03 Feb 2010 14:15:00 +0000Collected Evidence: Individual Study: 30 years of vegetal change following burning of sagebrush-grass rangeIndividual Studyhttp%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Findividual-study%2F1972http%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Findividual-study%2F1972Tue, 08 Jun 2010 09:07:00 +0100Collected Evidence: Individual Study: 'Beetle banks' as refuges for beneficial arthropods in farmland: long-term changes in predator communities and habitatIndividual Studyhttp%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Findividual-study%2F2835http%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Findividual-study%2F2835Tue, 04 Oct 2011 14:15:01 +0100Collected Evidence: Collected Evidence: Add perches to electricity pylons to reduce electrocutionA single before-and-after study in Spain found that adding perches did not reduce electrocutions of Spanish imperial eagles Aquila adalberti.  Collected Evidencehttp%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F267http%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F267Thu, 19 Jul 2012 16:08:34 +0100Collected Evidence: Individual Study: A 12-year study of nest box utilization by black-bellied whistling ducksIndividual Studyhttp%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Findividual-study%2F3697http%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Findividual-study%2F3697Sat, 01 Sep 2012 15:29:52 +0100Collected Evidence: Individual Study: 40 years of natterjack toad conservation in EuropeIndividual Studyhttp%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Findividual-study%2F4804http%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Findividual-study%2F4804Thu, 20 Jun 2013 14:17:01 +0100Collected Evidence: Individual Study: 2010 OverviewIndividual Studyhttp%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Findividual-study%2F4891http%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Findividual-study%2F4891Thu, 20 Jun 2013 14:40:32 +0100Collected Evidence: Individual Study: A biodiversity assessment of compensatory mitigation wetlands in eastern South DakotaIndividual Studyhttp%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Findividual-study%2F4940http%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Findividual-study%2F4940Thu, 20 Jun 2013 14:42:30 +0100Collected Evidence: Individual Study: ‘State of the nation’ report on New Zealand translocations including a quick overview of past translocationsIndividual Studyhttp%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Findividual-study%2F5114http%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Findividual-study%2F5114Thu, 20 Jun 2013 15:01:50 +0100Collected Evidence: Collected Evidence: Add lime to water bodies to reduce acidification One before-and-after study in the UK found that adding limestone to ponds resulted in establishment of one of three translocated populations of natterjack toads. One replicated, site comparison study in the UK found that species-specific habitat management that included adding limestone to ponds increased natterjack toad populations. One before-and-after study in the UK found that adding limestone to ponds temporarily increased breeding by natterjack toads. Three before-and-after studies (including one controlled, replicated study) in the Netherlands and UK found that adding limestone increased larval and/or egg survival of moor frogs and common frogs and resulted in metamorphosis of natterjack toads at two of three sites. Two before-and-after studies (including one controlled study) in the UK found that adding limestone to ponds resulted in high tadpole mortality and pond abandonment by natterjack toads and higher numbers of abnormal common frog eggs.  Collected Evidencehttp%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F748http%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F748Thu, 18 Jul 2013 15:41:50 +0100Collected Evidence: Collected Evidence: Add salt to ponds to reduce chytridiomycosis One study in Australia found that following addition of salt to a pond containing the chytrid fungus, a population of green and golden bell frogs remained free of chytridiomycosis for at least six months.  Collected Evidencehttp%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F762http%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F762Fri, 16 Aug 2013 14:13:19 +0100Collected Evidence: Collected Evidence: Add nutrients to new ponds as larvae food source We found no evidence for the effects of adding nutrients, such as zooplankton, to new ponds on amphibian populations. 'No evidence' for an action means we have not yet found any studies that directly and quantitatively tested this action during our systematic journal and report searches. Therefore we have been unable to assess whether or not the action is effective or has any harmful impacts. Please get in touch if you know of such a study for this action.    Collected Evidencehttp%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F812http%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F812Thu, 22 Aug 2013 15:07:50 +0100Collected Evidence: Collected Evidence: Add specific plants to aquatic habitats We found no evidence for the effects of adding specific plants, such as emergent vegetation, to aquatic habitats on amphibian populations. 'No evidence' for an action means we have not yet found any studies that directly and quantitatively tested this action during our systematic journal and report searches. Therefore we have been unable to assess whether or not the action is effective or has any harmful impacts. Please get in touch if you know of such a study for this action.      Collected Evidencehttp%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F816http%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F816Thu, 22 Aug 2013 15:10:49 +0100Collected Evidence: Collected Evidence: Add mulch to cropsBiodiversity: Three replicated trials from Canada, Poland and Spain (including one also controlled, one also randomized and one also controlled and randomized) showed that adding mulch to crops (whether shredded paper, municipal compost or straw) increased soil animal and fungal numbers, diversity and activity. Of these, one trial also showed that mulch improved soil structure and increased soil organic matter. Nutrient loss: One replicated study from Nigeria found higher nutrient levels in continually cropped soil. Erosion: Five studies from India, France, Nigeria and the UK (including one controlled, randomized, replicated trial, one randomized, replicated trial, two replicated (one also controlled), and one controlled trial) found that mulches increased soil stability, and reduced soil erosion and runoff. One trial found that some mulches are more effective than others. Drought: Two replicated trials from India found that adding mulch to crops increased soil moisture. Yield: Two replicated trials from India found that yields increased when either a live mulch or vegetation barrier combined with mulch was used. SOIL TYPES COVERED: clay, fine loam, gravelly sandy loam, sandy, sandy-clay, sandy loam, sandy silt-loam, silty, silty loam.  Collected Evidencehttp%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F887http%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F887Fri, 27 Sep 2013 08:43:03 +0100Collected Evidence: Collected Evidence: Add lime to the soil to increase fertility One replicated, randomized controlled study in the USA found that adding lime increased vegetation cover.  Collected Evidencehttp%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F1249http%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F1249Fri, 03 Jun 2016 12:48:10 +0100Collected Evidence: Collected Evidence: Add organic matter One replicated, randomized, controlled study in Brazil found that leaf litter addition increased species richness of young trees. One replicated, controlled study in Costa Rica found leaf litter addition decreased young tree density in artificial forest gaps. Both studies found no effect of litter addition on the density of tree regenerations under intact forest canopy. One replicated, controlled study in Portugal found that adding plant material to the soil surface increased total plant cover. One replicated, controlled study in the USA found mixed effects on cover depending on understory plant group.  Collected Evidencehttp%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F1250http%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F1250Fri, 03 Jun 2016 12:51:42 +0100Collected Evidence: Collected Evidence: Add organic matter after tree planting Two replicated, randomized, controlled studies in the USA found that adding leaf litter or wood-chips before restoration planting increased seedling biomass, but decreased seedling emergence and survival.  Collected Evidencehttp%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F1258http%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F1258Mon, 06 Jun 2016 10:36:39 +0100Collected Evidence: Collected Evidence: Add lime to the soil after tree planting One of two replicated, randomized, controlled studies in the USA found that adding lime before restoration planting decreased the survival of pine seedlings. The other study found no effect of adding lime on planted oak seedling growth.  Collected Evidencehttp%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F1259http%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F1259Mon, 06 Jun 2016 10:42:49 +0100