Providing evidence to improve practice

Action: Artificially incubate and hand-rear gamebirds in captivity

Key messages

A single, replicated study in Finland found that hand-reared grey partridges Perdix perdix did not take off to fly as effectively as wild-caught birds, potentially making them more vulnerable to predation from ground predators.

 

Supporting evidence from individual studies

1 

A replicated ex situ study in 1993 and 1994 in Finland (Putaala et al. 1997) found that hand-reared grey partridges Perdix perdix took flight with a shallower take off angle (average of 31o tested on 12 birds) and climbed more slowly (climbing rate of 1.8 m/s for 11 birds) than wild-caught birds (average 44o for 19 birds tested and 2.7 m/s for 18 birds), potentially making them more vulnerable to predation from ground predators. 

 

Referenced papers

Please cite as:

Williams, D.R., Child, M.F., Dicks, L.V., Ockendon, N., Pople, R.G., Showler, D.A., Walsh, J.C., zu Ermgassen, E.K.H.J. & Sutherland, W.J. (2017) Bird Conservation. Pages 95-244 in: W.J. Sutherland, L.V. Dicks, N. Ockendon & R.K. Smith (eds) What Works in Conservation 2017. Open Book Publishers, Cambridge, UK.